My Tonto Tour: 14 Days Below the Rim, Part 6

Day 9.

I hung my watch directly over my face, in the tent, so there would be no chance of not hearing the alarm.  I was up at first light, had my kit packed and chose one of my quicker breakfasts: Alpineaire makes an instant smoothie that mixes with cold water.  I brought a few of them to try out on this trip.  They’re fast, taste good and are actually good for you.  Moving as quietly as I could, I packed up and started hiking at 7:30 – I did not want to wake the Bullroarer or her group and planned on staying ahead of them for the day.  They were just beginning to move around their camp, when I hiked out the ledges above them, leaving Lonetree.

More of the Tonto


The early start wasn’t a bad thing, the hike over to Grapevine Creek is almost 9 miles, a lot of it shade-free.  Hiking past Boulder Creek, nice water there this year, I passed a small group heading to Lonetree.  They had camped at Grapevine the previous night and were hiking out the S. Kaibab tomorrow.  Soon after, I passed a second group of five, also heading into Lonetree.  Lonetree would be a jumping place this evening.  Glad I was on my way up-canyon.

I had perfect hiking weather – a few wispy clouds and a slight breeze.  I pushed on at a pretty good pace and arrived at Grapevine in time for an early lunch/brunch.  I love Grapevine Creek.  Once you finish heading it out, it goes on FOREVER, you can find nice shade,  slick-rock pour-offs, and pools.

Grapevine Creek

The campsite arrangement can leave a bit to be desired.  There are three larger established tent areas, with a few smaller ones located close by, upstream.  This would be perfect if you were friends with everyone camping there, and you don’t mind potentially noisy groups.  I had walked downstream from the trail crossing to find a nice pool to go wading in, and then returned to my pack by the trail to eat and relax in the shade.  Looking around, I realized that if I stayed here, Bullroarer and her attendees would be right on top of me – the campsites are separated by about 5′ – 10′ of open air and dirt.  I really don’t mind sharing camping areas, with people that understand the idea of peace and quiet, and I understand the NPS’ desire to minimize human impacts in sensitive areas – riparian zones in the canyon are rare and delicate.  Keeping campsites from expanding all over the place is a necessity.  However, after listening to Bullroarer bragging at Lonetree (for my benefit) about how she didn’t care who else was there, I decided to tank up on water, and hike out.

Rest stop in GV


I’ve never managed to spend a night on the Tonto, out on the plateau. But, I’ve wanted to.  It means carrying extra water for a dry camp, in exchange you have complete solitude and expansive views of the canyon.  I hung out at Grapevine for a couple hours, just enjoying the creek and the shade, then loaded up and hiked another two miles, or so.  I found a fantastic location below a series of ledges, close to the edge of the Tapeats, complete with nice flat boulders for my kitchen.  It was perfect.  I had a flat slab for my tent, so when I broke camp the next morning there would be no trace that I’d been there.  The clouds completely disappeared by dusk, and there wasn’t a trace of wind so I didn’t bother with the rainfly.  It was completely silent, with a brilliant star show.  I even caught sight of a few meteors.  I did have to pull my buff over my eyes when the moon rose.  You can read by the moon down there.

Dry camp between Lonetree and Grapevine

Day 10.

Cottonwood Creek

Up at first light again, out on the plateau first light happens earlier than usual.  Not a problem. I was awake anyway.  Funny how early I’ll wake up when I go to bed at nightfall…  By adding the extra miles yesterday, out to my site on the plateau, I had fewer than 8 miles to cover to Hance Creek – my destination for this evening.  Along the way, I hiked through Cottonwood Creek, another lovely spot – flowing water, ferns, cottonwood trees and some nice campsites.  This trip, I would only stop long enough for a quick snack and to dip my toes in the creek.  I’ve camped here before, and I’ll be back.  From there, the trail winds out onto the Tonto plateau and passes below Horseshoe Mesa and the climb up to the Grandview Trail.  This would be the easiest route out, at this point, if I needed one.  I didn’t.  I kept hiking and made it to Hance Creek around noon, and hiked down to the large campsite under the cottonwood trees.

Hance Creek

There I met Bob and his daughter, from Salt Lake City.  They were on a New Hance to Grandview trip, testing new Hyperlight Mountain Gear backpacks.  They invited me to share the shade, and we chatted about our respective trips, work, future trip plans, etc.  They were only there for a rest stop and would be tanking up then heading out to find a plateau campsite, as I had done the previous night.  I bid them “Happy Trails” and decided to set my camp up in one of the small, single tent sites a bit upstream.  I didn’t want to hog the only large site, in case a group did happen to come in.  A couple of guys hiked in from the east and settled into a small site well downstream from me.  With the trees for cover and the creek noise, I felt like I had the place to myself.


Hance Creek is another of my favorite places in the canyon.  There are cottonwood trees, year round water, and the ever-present, nightly peeper chorus.  There is a panel of historic inscriptions, just up from where the main trail passes through the drainage, including one from the creeks’ namesake – John Hance.  I spent the afternoon relaxing, did some exploring and a little light housekeeping.

Hance Creek Inscription Rock

I try to rinse the dirt and sweat out of my socks every afternoon.  My big collapsable bucket comes in handy for this.  I have a spare pair to put on, while the ones I wash dry out.  It reduces blisters, for one thing.  If there is enough water available, I’ll do the same for my hiking shirt.  You can avoid (or at least alleviate) heat rash, pack sores, and other problems by practicing a little basic hygiene.  Biodegradable, no rinse soaps are a great way to go, keeping in mind to use them AWAY from the water source.  I see no problem wading in creeks or rivers, just don’t rinse soaps, detergents or any other chemicals off in the water source, not even the biodegradable ones.

After cleaning up, and dealing with the “warm spot” I’d developed on my big toe, during my speed hike out of Grapevine, I spent a little time drawing in my journal, then was ready for “Happy Hour” consisting of a batch of citrus flavored Cytomax and some spicy snack mix.  Dinner soon followed – freeze-dried chicken teriyaki and some dark chocolate squares.


I put away the kitchen, hung the Ratsack and waited for the Hance Creek Male Peeper Chorus to begin their concert.  The peepers in Hance are the loudest anywhere.  It could just be the proximity of the cliff to the creek.  It makes for a great echo chamber.  Needless to say, I don’t actually fall asleep quickly in Hance.  The concert usually doesn’t end until around midnight.

A “Peeper”