Packing Light: Getting the weight down without going to extremes.

I don’t enjoy carrying a heavy pack.  And, while I’m not a zealot or fanatic, I do try to reduce the weight and volume of the gear that I carry on multiday backpacking trips.  If you’re looking for extreme ultralight, minimalist tips/suggestions this isn’t where to find them.  I’m the Ultralight (UL) backpacking version of Rudolph:  I’d be banned from the “UL Club,” not invited to join in the UL Games.  My backpack has a well-padded hip-belt and stays.  I actually carry a (gasp) TENT!  I use an isobutane canister stove (gasp, again).  I carry and sit in a chair (Heathen!).   I don’t cook/drink/eat out of the same cup.  I refuse to rely on leaves when compact rolls of TP are easy to make and carry.  I reduce weight and increase efficiency whenever I can, but I do like to be comfortable.  You know, I like to enjoy the experience.

Packed and ready



Even with all of these, what some would decry as unnecessary luxuries, I manage to carry a sub-30 lb pack on multi-day trips (5-7 day), including water and food.  It takes a bit of researching and trial and error, but it’s possible to build a lightweight, but very comfortable kit.  Ask anyone that knows me, they’ll tell you I spend a lot of time reading up on gear – I love gear!  Show me a lightweight, functional, multipurpose toy and my attention is yours. That said, I don’t like the idea of buying/replacing/tossing a piece of gear every season, every time a new variation comes along.  I’ll do my homework, compare different models, variations, manufacturers and try to decide how long the item in question will last, and will a significantly more efficient/useful model come out in a year?  Can I modify what I already have to be lighter and more usable? Can I make my own version, better for my purposes? Does it make sense to replace an existing, functioning piece of gear, for a “better” one?  Sometimes, yes.

It all goes in.

A perfect example of this is my new stove.  For several years, I’ve been using a very lightweight, titanium stove by Snowpeak – The Litemax.  It comes in at under 2 oz, busts out over 11,000 BTU’s, and takes up hardly any space in my pack.  That said, I’ve always found it susceptible to the slightest breeze – you have to build elaborate windscreens to protect it – and, it takes almost 3 1/2 minutes to bring a pint of water to a boil.  I never put much thought into this, and just accepted it.  I would carry a medium (8oz) canister of fuel for it, for a 7-day trip and it would be empty, consistently, at the end of the trip.  With the stove, pot, stabilizer, cup/bowl, and lid the whole kitchen weighed in at 15 ounces.  Last summer, I participated in a gear-testing outing, organized by my employer.  Several of us went out to test prototype tents, packs, shelters, etc.  We each had our own cooking equipment, and I was able to witness a variety of stoves and set-ups.  Jetboil stoves made up the majority.  While those of us using traditional, open burner stoves (my Litemax, an MSR Whisperlight, an MSR Pocket Rocket, etc) were still waiting for our kettles to boil, the Jetboilers were already a couple minutes into actually rehydrating their meals.  The system stoves were significantly faster.  The other standout feature I noticed was their fuel canisters – the Jetboil devotees all had the tiny, 4 oz canisters and had fuel to spare at the end of the trip.  They were significantly more fuel efficient, under 2 minutes to boil a pint of water.  I decided to upgrade.  I purchased a Jetboil MiniMo.  The MiniMo has a regulator and valve that enables effective use in cold weather, something that other canister stoves leave you wanting, and great simmer control.  On its inaugural trip, my recent 2-week Grand Canyon trip, I got 10.6 quarts of water boiled with one, 4 oz canister.  My old Litemax averaged 4.5 quarts of water boiled with the same size canister.  The system weighs just under a pound, and by switching the included lid with a lighter one I already had, I shaved off another ounce.  I didn’t have to build a single windscreen.  I ditched the lighter I needed with my Litemax (I do carry emergency matches) because the built-in igniter on the Jetboil is reliable.  I’m a convert.

The kitchen and “Dinner Ball”

Continuing with the cooking theme: anther way I reduce weight and volume and increase efficiency in the “kitchen” is by repackaging all of my food.  Friends that I camp with like to joke about my “dinner balls.”  I am a freeze-dried food devotee.  I find it tastes better than dehydrated, and side by side, usually holds more of its nutritional value than dehydrated.  It’s easy to prepare.  Most importantly, it’s lighter and more compact.  I’ll repackage the meal, tossing the original, bulky packaging, using food safe oven roasting bags or crockpot liners.  Just pour the dried meal into one corner of a roaster bag, twist it down into a small ball, tie it off with a twist-tie, trim off the excess and write the water measurement and boil time on the outside with a marker.  If I do it right, I can get two meals bagged with one roaster liner, one in each corner.  These weigh significantly less, in this form than they do as packaged by their manufacturer, and after I’ve eaten, the empty bag is much smaller to carry out than the empty, heavy foil pouch.  No muss, no fuss.

Next, I’ll rant about my camp “furniture” requirements.  It has to do with the fact that I will NOT sleep out, under the stars, on a groundsheet.  Something about scorpions, spiders, mice, packrats, sudden downpours….