Monthly Archives: January 2010

Roadside Ruins ie. Drive-by Archaeology…

I’ve had people ask me if there are any archaeological sites to visit that don’t require “hiking”.  My first instinct is to ask “Why wouldn’t you want to take a nice hike?  That’s part of the fun!”  Well, for many, hiking isn’t … Continue reading

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The Moki, Moqui, Mokee Dugway…

I will always remember the first time I looked down the Mokee Dugway.  I was starting off my summer, working as a seasonal ranger on Cedar Mesa.  As we stood on the edge of the drop-off Laura, my supervisor and one of … Continue reading

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Chimney Rock on track to becoming monument – KRDO.com Colorado Springs and Pueblo News, Weather and Sports

Associated Press – January 16, 2010 1:54 PM ET PAGOSA SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) – The Chimney Rock Archaeological Area may soon become a national monument. U.S. Rep. John Salazar's deputy press secretary, Edward Stern, says the congressman is working on … Continue reading

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201001163067 | Crew studies whether 1539 etching on Phoenix South Mountain is real

Arizona Republic Sitting inside a metal cage with a roll of masking tape and a scraping tool in his hands, Ron Dorn looked over his shoulder and said there is “not a chance” that a Spanish explorer etched an inscription … Continue reading

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Vandalism discovered at rock art site near Yuma

Authorities are offering up to a $1,500 reward for information leading to the identification and prosecution of those responsible for vandalism at the Sears Point archaeological site in Yuma County. Arizona Bureau of Land Management rangers discovered the vandalism late … Continue reading

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Stone Tools, Lithics, and Such..

To me there is something about finding an ancient stone tool that is so exciting, satisfying, inspirational even. One might reply to this with “You need to get a life”, but if you think about it, it isn’t such a strange idea. A carefully knapped chert projectile point, a perfect hammer stone, a well shaped drill or even a metate, the durable goods of the ancient world. They didn’t simply pop into existence. Each one was planned, thought out, hand-made with skill and care. Continue reading

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