Panther Cave: Rock Art in Danger

Panther Cave: Rock Art in Danger

Carolyn Boyd, executive director of the SHUMLA School, and noted expert on the rock art of the Lower Pecos, offers new interpretations of the region’s rock art based on the extensive research by the SHUMLA-led team.  Carolyn Boyd, executive director of the SHUMLA School, and noted expert on the rock art of the Lower Pecos, offers new interpretations of the region’s rock art based on the extensive research by the SHUMLA-led team. In the dramatically scenic canyon of the Lower Pecos River, where ancient limestone cliffs rise steeply above from the water’s surface, and prehistoric rock art awaits in hundreds of shelters eroded over eons from the sheer rock face, it seems odd that a single year would be the topic of conversation. After all, the surrounding desert landscape appears almost eternal, and on the waters of Lake Amistad, the craggy shoreline environment suggests that time should be considered in a sweep much more vast than just one number on the calendar of history: 1954.But 1954 is the year we’re discussing as our group of four floats in a National Park Service jet boat on Lake Amistad. The boat sits mid-channel, at the point where the Pecos joins the Rio Grande, not far from the US 90 high bridge, west of Comstock. Why this year instead of all others?

via Panther Cave: Rock Art in Danger.

This entry was posted in Ancient American Southwest, Archaeology, CRM Archaeology, National Parks, Prehistoric America and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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