Mesa Verde National Park

Managed by the National Park Service, Mesa Verde is situated on top of Chapin Mesa in southwest Colorado, just thirty miles from Cortez on Hwy 160. The road to the park, and all interior roads open to the public, are paved.

What You Can See

There are over 4,000 known archeological sites in Mesa Verde National Park, ranging from Basketmaker II mesa top farm/village sites to Pueblo III cliff dwellings. Only a small percentage of the sites in the park have been excavated. Several of the spectacular cliff dwellings are accessible to the public via guided ranger tours. Stop by the visitors center on the way into the park to pick up a map and reserve a place on a tour. There are also several self-guided trails leading visitors to villages, pithouses and irrigation features.

Tips for Your Visit

Plan for two days to see both sides of the park. There are two main “loops” with plenty to see and do. There is a camp ground in the park, as well as a lodge and assorted dining facilities. If you plan to stay in the lodge or campground, make reservations early. They fill up quickly. There is a fee to enter the park, this varies depending on when you plan to visit. The pass is good for 7 days.

Grand Gulch In Bears Ears National Monument

Grand Gulch, part of the newly established Bears Ears National Monument, is a remote canyon system located south and west of Blanding, UT. Numerous sites dating from the Archaic period to PIII can be found here, as well as some of the finest examples of ancient rock art in the Southwest.

Backpacking in Lower Grand Gulch
Getting There

Located on State Route 261, the Kane Gulch Ranger Station is 4 miles south of US Hwy 95 at the upper entry point into Grand Gulch, visitors to the area need to stop by here and register with the ranger and pay the day use fee, or overnight fee if you are backpacking in the canyon. As the name implies, this is a non-developed, primitive recreation area. Access into the canyon is by foot travel, although horse/pack animal access is allowed in certain portions of the canyon. The trails in and out of the canyon can range from steep, slightly technical scrambles to long, flat sand washes with everything in between.

What You Can See

Besides the incredible scenery of the canyon itself, several archaeological sites including Jail House Ruin, Perfect Kiva and Junction Ruin, as well as dozens of granaries and rock art too numerous to count are all located in Grand Gulch, many within day-hiking range from the BLM Ranger station at Kane Gulch.

Surrounding Grand Gulch, Cedar Mesa offers beautiful hiking, primitive car camping (in established sites) and opportunities to explore numerous mesa top sites.

Tips for Your Visit
Take only pictures

Transportation on Cedar Mesa can be an adventure in itself. The roads leading off of State route 261 consist of unimproved dirt roads, most requiring at least an all-wheel drive vehicle. Low clearance, 2-wheel drive cars may not get you where you want to go here. Keep in mind that the character of any one of the Cedar Mesa roads can change dramatically after one rain storm. Washouts, sandy areas and arroyo cutting are all part of the adventure.

Slick rock campsites – Leave No Trace

The ranger station has a good collection of books and maps for sale, focusing on the Grand Gulch/Cedar Mesa area. The rangers will also have information regarding which archaeological sites are open and accessible to the public. In addition, they have current water conditions and weather forecasts. Both are very important for anybody planning on venturing below the canyon rims. For more information on visiting archaeologically sensitive areas, check this link out.

 

My Tonto Tour: 14 Days Below the Rim, Part 8

Day 13.

Hiking up and out of Escalante Creek.

Woke up and got going as early as I could.  My goal was Tanner Beach, and that would be a 10.5-mile hike, across the most rugged terrain of my trip, so far.  It would also be the hottest day of my 2-week journey, across the appropriately named Furnace Flats section, below the Unkar Overlook.  Yay me.  The morning started out, as usual, a quick breakfast, pack up, hit the trail and enjoy the morning shade as long as it would last.  The first mile, or so, of trail wound it’s way along the lower end of Escalante Creek (a dry wash) and began to ascend up on to the ridge, immediately north of the drainage just as the sun devoured the last of the shade.  Perfect timing.  The route is easy enough to see/follow.  It is narrow and sloping in many places, so careful footwork is required.  I just kept up with my “…get there when you get there.” mantra, and listened to the theme song from “The Great Escape” play itself over, and over again in my head.  PLEASE! Someone change the record!  I stopped for a quick snack on the crest of the ridge and took in the view.  It never gets old, looking around in the canyon.  I also found my first tick of the season, and the second tick I’ve ever seen down here.  I noticed it scurrying up my pant leg as I stood up to put on my pack.  I gave it a good thump and sent it over the edge.  Not today, my friend. Not today.

The Escalante Route

From the crest of the first ridge, the trail contours around the red, shale slope and maneuvers through a steep, boulder covered section.  Mercifully, it was slightly shady here, and I made decent time despite having to pick my way around the rocks.  It was here, almost exactly halfway between the Tanner and New Hance Trailheads, at 11:30 am, that I encountered four invincible male hominids, aged 19 – 25.  They were all gingerly picking their way through the boulders when the one in the lead looked up, quite startled to see a lone hiker on the trail with a backpack.  All four were dressed in light running kits – minimalist hydration bladder packs, a couple Gu pouches, running shoes/shorts/t-shirts.  Their packs weren’t big enough for any kind of water filtration, extra clothing or substantial food.  I just assumed they had come up from a camp at the river.  The one bringing up the rear paused to catch his breath, so I said “Hey. Nice day for it.” He asked where I was headed, and I told him my itinerary for the day.  I asked where they had spent the night before, and he looked confused.  “Did you camp at Tanner or Cardenas?” I asked.  “No.” he replied. “We came down the Tanner this morning.”  “Wow,” was all I could muster.  “We’re running out the ‘New something…?'”  “The New Hance?” “Yeah! That one. It’s my first time here.  I’m just following my friends.”  At this point I decided not to break it to him that he still had 15 miles to go, the easiest 15 miles were actually behind him, and that it would get really warm before they even got to the river, which resembled chocolate milk and was the only water source between themselves and the rim.  “Well, I need to get moving so I can get a good campsite. Have a nice run.”  I didn’t see any helicopters circling the next day, but they usually wait 24 hours, so…

Heading toward the Unkar Overlook

From that point, I just continued on around and out onto the ridge overlooking the Unkar area.  The “hilltop ruin” is located a short way off, and is worth a visit.  The views from the structure are amazing.  So is the ancient finger of gravel bar it’s perched on!  The next leg of my hike was spread out below me – Furnace Flats, Cardenas Creek, and heat waves, visibly radiating up from all of it.  I can’t imagine what this place would be like in July.  I don’t really want to.  I’ll stick to spring.  The trail from the Unkar Overlook winds down to the sandy flats by Cardenas.  I walked down to the river, ate lunch in the shade, by the beach and found a 1/2 full bottle of sunscreen!  Perfect timing, this find, as my little stash was empty and I was starting to pink-up on my shoulders.  Thank you, unknown person, for the extra UV protection AND moisturizer, thank you.  I checked my water supply and decided I had enough to make it to Tanner. Time to move on, it would only get hotter as the day wore on.

Hilltop Ruin

The trail leads away from Cardenas Beach, winds through the sand dunes, past several well camouflaged prehistoric sites, and strikes out across the dark brown/black gravel covered “Furnace Flats.”  The ambient temperature was around 80 that afternoon, and it felt about 20 degrees warmer.  By the time I crossed out of the Cardenas Use Area and entered the Tanner area, I still had a mile or so to go, and I was sucking air out of my hydration bladder.  Mercifully, the distance went by quickly and I got to Tanner between 2:30 and 3:00 without feeling too miserable.  I snagged my favorite campsite, at the west end of the area, under some junipers, with a rocky beach.

Tanner Beach camp

My first chore was collecting and filtering, and drinking water.  This would be my last afternoon/evening at the river (on this trip) and I set up my sunshade, rinsed off in the river and enjoyed being there.  By dusk, I realized I had the entire area to myself.  I walked up river to the little ledges campsite on the other side of Tanner Creek, and, no one.  I was the only human at the mouth of Tanner Canyon.  Well, it should be a very quiet night.

Sunset at Tanner

Day 14.

The day would turn out to be my last in the canyon, for this trip. My original plan called for tanking up with enough water to hike up to a dry campsite, above the Red Wall.  It would mean carrying extra water weight for the day, but I would have a shorter hike today, and a really short hike the next day.  I was up and out of Tanner by 8:05 am and had a shady hike for the first 90 minutes.  At 9:30 the sun rose above the canyon rim and there was no ducking it.  The trek across the Dox is hot, and a bit tedious – it seems to go on forever.

Leaving the Tanner Area

Once you’ve ascended above this, the trail steepens and you get fewer flat sections to catch your breath on.  There are a few little places, here and there, to rest in patches of shade, and I took advantage whenever I could.  Before I knew it, I was at the break in the Red Wall and could see my destination for the day – just up there.  I topped out on the Red Wall at 12:30, ate a handful of cashews and then started down the trail to my intended campsite.

Heading up the break in The Red Wall

I’ve camped up here before, and I like a particular site, between two big, cube-shaped boulders below the trail.  It is situated directly below the Desert Watchtower, and if the wind is right, you can hear the tourist chatter on the tower.  It was another hot afternoon, so I pitched up my poncho/tarp against the large boulder, for some shade and ate lunch and rehydrated.  I was just relaxing, enjoying the shade and the nice, cool breeze when it occurred to me: “Why is there a cool breeze?”

My intended campsite

I looked out from my tarp, just as a gust of wind whipped up a dust devil.  Large, dark clouds had started building up on three sides.  By this point, I had no idea what the weather forecast was.  The bulletin board at Indian Garden had a 4-day forecast posted there, but that was 7 days ago.  What was blowing in, and would it impede my hike out, up the friction slabs at the top of the trail?  It was about 2 pm, so I decided to give it an hour, and see what happened.  By 3:00 the clouds were beginning to consolidate and the wind was increasing.  It was decided: Take enough water to hike out, put on the dry socks and head for the top.  It would make for a long, steep day, but I wouldn’t have to navigate potentially wet slick rock slabs at the top.

Leaving early

Besides, a beer and cheeseburger suddenly sounded pretty good.  The only potential issue, aside from how tiring I knew it would be, was finding a place to stay that night.  I had a campsite at Mather CG reserved for the next night and had nothing planned for an early exit.  I also wanted to try and get out and to the Village by 8:00 – a hot shower would really be a treat, and they close at 8:00.  I drank a liter of water, ate the last of my chocolate and cashews, laced up my boots and started out.

I got up to Stegosaurus Rocks and met a couple resting after their hike down.  He said the weather forecast didn’t look bad, but the buildup and wind hadn’t been predicted.  I bid them farewell and kept hiking.  From that point, the hike out isn’t too terrible.  There are a couple of loose, steep sections (where have I heard that before) and, where the trail crosses through the drainage, large sandstone steps that trail crews have constructed.  After ascending the Coconino formation, you start a series of switchbacks that wind through the trees.  At the bottom of the Kaibab formation, you’re in the forest and the temperatures are significantly lower that what you’ve been used to.  I zipped my pant legs back on and kept going.

At 6:00 pm, 2.5 hours after leaving my little site below the Tower, I came to a set of stone steps that climb up, and abruptly end at the edge of the paved road leading to Lipan Point Overlook.  And, with that, I was done.  I walked the short distance down to my truck, found a note from my wife on the dash, and thanked the canyon gods when the engine turned over without any hesitation.

The “end”

I drove into the Village, and immediately found the campgrounds booked up for the night, “NO VACANCY!” I then headed to the rim and went into the lobby of the El Tovar – the rim’s fanciest accommodation.  They also have access to any available rooms at the other hotels.  As it turns out, the only room available, on the South Rim, that night, was in the El Tovar and they offered me a ridiculous deal on it, despite how I looked and smelled.  The receptionist was actually quite excited to hear about my trip, and when I told him how long I’d been out, he took another $50 off the price of the room.  Nice people, those folks at Xanterra.

I took the longest hot shower I’ve ever taken, well, not too long.  It is the desert, after all.  You don’t appreciate hot water and soap until you have been rinsing off in 50 degree, silty, chocolate water for days.  It was at this point that I noticed my tan.  I’d spent time at the beach in my climbing bra, burned through my long sleeved shirt on the trail, had pinked up around my pack straps, had worn my pant legs rolled up, or zipped off, been barefoot, worn my boots with my shorts.  It all made for some interesting “topo lines” on my skin. Think “pink zebra.”  After my shower, I found a cheeseburger, salad, ice-cold IPA and phoned home.

Home.

Usually, I find myself feeling down at the end of a backpacking trip.  I put time into planning them and anticipating them, and then they’re done and behind me and I feel somehow disappointed, for lack of a better word.  I haven’t experienced that this time, yet.  I put more planning and effort into this trip, than usual.  It’s the longest solo hike I’ve ever done, the longest number of days I’ve put in on a backpacking trip – period.  I wasn’t afraid at any time, leading up to or during, that I wouldn’t be able to do it.  My only real concern was how I’d do being along with my head for ten days.  I’ve never done that before.  Prior to the trip, that sounded like a lot.  Looking back, it wasn’t much.  I was in shape for it. I had prepared materially for it.  The only equipment failure I had was a blown tent zipper (no biggie).  I had worried about what it would feel like when I would catch site of the Tanner Trailhead, my endpoint.  Would it be sad, would I feel disappointed that it was over? As the signboard at the top of the Tanner came into view, I didn’t experience any of that.  I understood there, that I had taken this on for my own reason, to do the thing.  Not how many miles I would cover in total, how fast I would do it, how “burly” it would be, what would my time be when I set my trekking pole tips at the trails’ end?  My goal/reward/project was to go through the experience of the whole thing.  That was it. All along, I’d been telling myself that I would get there when I get there.  Well, I was here.  Getting here was just part of the package.  I had been rewarding myself the entire way, by just “doing the thing,” by just getting to know myself in this remote, rugged, potentially lethal, spectacularly beautiful place.  It’s wasn’t the PCT, AT, or someone else’s “epic” journey.  It was my journey, that I planned and executed and thoroughly enjoyed from start to finish.  I think I’ll be able to ride the high for awhile, then I’ll head out on the next one.

I did it.

 

My Tonto Tour: 14 Days Below the Rim, Part 7

Day 11.

Down to the river!

The hike from Hance Creek down to the river, and Hance Rapid (the mouth of Red Canyon) is about 6.5 miles.  Heading-out Hance Creek is pretty easy, not too steep or loose.  I left my campsite at Hance Creek around 7:30, and had good hiking weather – not hot, nice breeze, etc.

Leaving Hance Creek

Even in mid-March, as you drop lower into the canyon it can feel hot.  The reflected heat always feels about 15-20 degrees warmer than the ambient temperature.  The hike down to Hance Rapid is also dry.  Along the way, you hike through Mineral Canyon, a very interesting section of the Tonto.  You pass through layers of petrified water ripples – shallow lake or sea shore deposits.  These sit directly atop a huge, cemented cobble bed, resembling a frozen river bottom.  It’s pretty cool.

Ripples in Time

 

As I was heading out this canyon, I passed two small, separate groups that were hiking out the Grandview.  They’d come down the Tanner a few days before and were enjoying their last couple of days on the trail.

After you leave Mineral Canyon behind, you arrive at the top of a sloping rock garden.  The trail winds it’s way through the large boulders, often marked by cairns.  There are a lot of good places to duck into the shade here if you’re overheating.  You can see Hance Rapid, and you can hear it!

The Rock Garden

About 45 minutes or so, the trail unceremoniously dumps you out at the edge of the beach, and when you pass between the two cairns, you’ve come to the end of the Tonto Trail.  You’re now on the Escalante Route, that will carry you east to the Tanner Trail.  The trail goes along the beach for a short distance, past a couple of larger boaters campsites and then ascends up slightly, into the sand dunes.  This little bit doesn’t make for pleasant hiking, with a pack on, but the dunes are quite scenic and, when I went through, covered with Sand Verbena flowers.

The End/Beginning of The Tonto Trail

My destination for this afternoon was a campsite, by the river, at the top of Hance Rapid.  There is a very nice site situated under a small grove of large mesquite trees, and I usually stay there.  It is really set up for multiple tents/people, so I opted for a small, single site in the willows below.  The big site is for sharing with friends and, again, I didn’t want to take up more room than I needed, in case a larger group showed up.  As it was, I didn’t see another human soul all day or that evening.  I had the entire area to myself!  I took advantage of the shallow, sandy bottomed river by my campsite and cleaned up, rinsed clothes and just relaxed and enjoyed the roar – Hance Rapid is a loud one.

Hance Rapid Camp

After a light dinner of Mountain House Lasagna (one of my favorites) and some chocolate, I crawled into my tent and fell asleep to the roar and vibration of the rapid.  I wanted to get an early start tomorrow, and would be looking out for my friends that had put in on a raft trip, seven days prior.  I knew they’d be floating through this section (15 – 20 miles) and hoped to at least catch a glimpse of them.  I know, total long shot…  I also had the infamous “Papago Slide” to deal with in the morning, and wanted to put it behind me before it started to warm up.

Day 12.

Papago Slide – looking up

Papago was waiting for me.  I woke up early, even though I knew I only had around four miles to hike, today.  My plan was to hike up to the mouth of Escalante Creek, and if the beach was dry and available, camp there.  First, I had to maneuver up the Papago – a 20-minute crawl up a large, cone-shaped talus slope.  The trail ascends this thing because the river cuts it off at the cliff edge below.  It’s about a 45 degree slope, completely covered with assorted rubble/boulders/rocks in various stages of “stability” or, instability depending on where you put your feet.  The trick is to keep an eye out for the “trail” (the obvious route previous hikers have taken), check the slabs you’re going to step on and make sure they’re solid, and move quickly.  If you’re going up, I find the right side to be preferable.  About half-way up, small stones began tumbling down past me, and I looked up to see a family of “Bumblies” trying to descend, in mass, down the upper left side.  I asked them to please wait until I was up and clear of them, and they seemed quite surprised to see me.  I’m not actually sure how they got to where they were, but when I suggested going down one at a time, and following the cairns, they agreed that it sounded like a good idea.

Group trying to descend The Slide

At the top, I stopped to take a photo and yelled “Hi!” to a kayaker floating past, below.  He told me there was a large group of boaters camped about 1/4 mile up-river, and I might find my friends there.  I’d been really lucky on my trip, so far.  Maybe it would be Kat and Joe!

After you get through the “Slide” you have to down-climb the Papago Ledges.  It’s a short, easy, class V section of slabby ledges.  A section of rope or cord comes in handy here for lowering packs.  Being solo, I chose to use caution and lowered my pack down all three short, down-climbs.  Reshouldering the beast, I hit the edge of the beach and walked over to the rafter’s camp.  They were just finishing rigging their rafts for the day when I caught sight of my friend Joe – I’d know those striped boardie shorts anywhere.  I casually strolled up to him (he didn’t know I was in the canyon) and smiled.  He looked a bit shocked, let out a few endearing expletives and gave me, and my pack, a giant bear-hug.  “What the #$&* are you doing down here?!?”  After recovering, he told me where Kat was, and I went over and startled her.  She knew I would be in the canyon but, like I had also assumed, didn’t think we would actually intersect on our trips.  It was really fun running into them.  Just like I was, they were having a fantastic trip! After catching up for a few minutes, it was time for them to get going, and I needed to start my hike up as well.  Kat gave me a much battered can of beer, that I would “put in the fridge” once I made camp.  I waved them all on their way, and started out, on my way.

Friends
The Way is Shut…

Hiking up, into the mouth of 75 Mile Canyon is one of the best sections of trail, anyplace.  It’s a gravel wash that leads into a very lovely slot canyon.  You wind your way along the bottom to where the slot canyon ends at a pour-off/bowl.  An easy scramble up and you’re back on the main trail again.  The entry into the slot reminds me of the Paths of the Dead in The Lord of The Rings – “The way is shut.”

75 Mile slot exit

A quick hike around from the top of the slot canyon, and you descend down to the river along a route of mixed dirt path and stone ledges.  Here, I found the beach I was hoping would be dry and empty, dry and empty.  It was all mine.  I set up my camp at one end of it, put my beer in “the fridge” and enjoyed a long afternoon at the beach: wading, drawing, filtering water, snacking and relaxing.

Beachfront property

There was a breeze blowing that evening, so after dinner (Chili-Mac washed down with a cold beer) and cleaning up, I put the fly on the tent.  It helps keep sand dunes from forming inside.  Tomorrow would be a long, hot, mostly dry day with a lot of narrow, up-hill trail to cover.

Happy Hour, thanks to Kat.

My Tonto Tour: 14 Days Below the Rim, Part 4

Day 5.

After saying “Happy Trails” to my friend, I turned left at the Hermit Trail/Tonto Trail junction and began the short, easy hike around to Monument Creek.  This is another of my favorite Tonto trail sections.  Great scenery and the first half is shaded if you get up and leave Hermit early enough in the day.  We had a relatively timely start, later than I’d wanted, but not too bad.  The night before, I had been awakened around midnight by a small noise and looked up to see a mouse, spread-eagled above my face.  He had crawled up the mesh wall of my tent and was peering down at me.  I said “Hello” and gave him a gentle thump.  After falling back to sleep, I managed to sleep through the alarm I’d set on my watch, and didn’t wake up until the sun was starting to light up the sides of Hermit Canyon – so much for the early start.

From the junction, it’s a straightforward contour around to Monument.  You have one low ridge to ascend about half way that affords you a great up/down canyon view.  After heading out a small, unnamed side drainage you see “The Monument.”

The Monument

 

It’s a 130′, free-standing spire of Tapeats sandstone that gives the location its name.  A few short, steep switchbacks bring you into the Monument Creek drainage, past the large group site under the trailside ledges and then past the famous Three-Seater toilet.  It’s one of the most scenic, and sociable toilets in the world.  Open to the air, with three seats divided by low privacy walls, it looks up on the Red Wall and is perfectly visible (binoculars help) from The Abyss Overlook, up on the South Rim.

The Three Seater, Demonstration Photo

I walked into the campground early enough that I had my choice of sites.  I chose the last, small site overlooking the creek.  It was sheltered in the trees, mostly invisible from the main trail and had its own access trail to the water.  After a quick snack, I hung my food up in my Ratsack and headed downstream to the bedrock pour-offs and pools.  The creek was running high and cold.  After a quick dunking of your head, you can sprawl on the sun-warmed granite and relax.  Monument is another of my favorite places in the canyon, although the last time I was here I was with a group of friends, so was feeling a bit nostalgic/lonely.  There is great exploring to be done downstream, lots of birds, lots of shade.

Monument Creek

After I’d eaten dinner, and put away the kitchen, I heard a noise down in the creekbed – a short gurgling sound, and the crunching of gravel.  I looked over and my trail tired, overfed brain shouted “Oh my god! A condor!”  I quickly came to my senses and registered a large wild turkey, picking his way down the creek.  Which, at the time made about as much sense as the condor theory.  I snapped a couple photos of him.  They look alot like the classic “Bigfoot” photos you see online.  He did not stand still for me, and the light was terrible but you can make him out.  Apparently, it’s not too unusual.  Turkeys do come down below the rim, and sometimes they’ll even winter over at Phantom Ranch.  The ranger I ran into the next day was really excited to hear about him.  Weird.

The Monument Creek Turkey

Despite the two largish groups that came in later in the day, it was pretty quiet in Monument.  The creek drowns out most human-caused noises and at dusk, the ever-increasing peeper population began their chorus.  Peepers, if I didn’t mention earlier, are the amorous little frogs that inhabit the Grand Canyon, wherever there is enough water to lay their eggs.  They sing a variety of tunes – telephones ringing, goats bleating, doors creaking, small tubas, etc., occasionally a large belching call will emanate from the shadows.  When they all join in, it makes for quite a concert.

Day 6.

I managed to wake up early the next morning.  I had a 10.7-mile trek around to Indian Garden ahead of me, where my friend Mike would bring down my resupply bag, and my wife and a couple friends would come down the next day with a pair of clean pants (and a salad)!!  I had two nights at Indian Garden campground, to rest, resupply and rehydrate/calorie up for the next half of my trip.  I was looking forward to drinking straight from a faucet, with no filtering/treating required.  I Left Monument at 8:10 sharp.  The trick to a pleasant exit from Monument is to start hiking out before the sun has hit the east wall of the canyon.  There is a steep set of switchbacks that will take you up and out, and they can be miserable if they’re in full sun.  I managed to get through them in 15 minutes, well before the sun hit and was cruising along the Tonto towards Salt Creek.

On the Tonto

The Tonto contours along, winding through the sage and wild flowers.  Again, I meandered off the route a few times, but it was easy enough to regain it.  Cedar Spring had water flowing, very lightly, and there was a group camped there.  I was really surprised to see Salt Creek flowing, a few gallons a minute.  A Backcountry Ranger was hiking out, towards me as I was descending into Salt.  She’d spent the night there and was heading for Hermit, with a quick stop at Monument to check some wildlife monitoring equipment.  She was very interested in my turkey encounter.  After turning down her generous offer for some chocolate, we parted ways and I continued on to Horn Creek.

 

Horn Creek is a nice, shady spot with a lovely little stream that you can’t drink from.  It’s contaminated by radiation from the abandoned Lost Orphan Mine directly above, on the rim.  A shame, since it is a reliable water source and a really pretty spot.  It’s a designated campsite, but really it’s a “dry” camp.  Although, I’ve seen people tank up there, not knowing what was in the water.  I moved on through and found a shady spot back out on the Tonto.  I continued along, whistling the theme song to The Great Escape – it had been stuck in my head for 4 days.  It still tries to worm its’ way in there.  Not sure what to do about that…

Approaching Indian Garden

I rounded the corner into Indian Garden at 2 pm, not a bad pace if you add in my lunch stop and other quick rests.  You pass the junction for the trail out to Plateau Point, and then you start to see the cottonwood trees that fill the bottom of Garden Creek canyon.  After trudging past the herd of tourists that had walked down from the rim, taking in the array of assorted footwear (some improper), inadequate water containers and watching them try to avoid getting bit by squirrels, while feeding them, in full view of the “Do Not Feed The Squirrels” sign, I turned up the path into the campground.  I found Mike sitting at one of the campsite picnic tables, he’d arrived about an hour before.  I think he was surprised to see me.  I’d originally expected to get into IG around 4 pm.  I guess I’d moved faster than I’d thought I would.  I owe him a beer (or several).  He drove in from Kingman, hiked my 10 lb food bag down, spent the night and turned around a headed back out the next day.  His wife was planning on joining him but had to cancel, so he came alone.  Mike and Gale were the ones responsible for this whole thing – they invited me on a Grandview/New Hance trip in 2011, and with that introduction, I was hooked.  I’ve been back every year, since.

Mike didn’t just have my pre-packed food cache with him.  Gale sent chocolate, and my wife sent an orange, and some Pringles!! Yay, salt! I devoured this stuff right away.  I had packed a Hostess fruit pie in my bag – it made it down, uncrushed and full of fatty, junky, sugary goodness!  Perfect dessert after my gourmet meal of Mt House Spaghetti, herbed olives and spicy snack mix.  I stayed up past my bedtime, catching up with Mike and playing with the timer setting on my camera.  There was a huge packrat running around the perimeter of our campsite, so we made sure to lock up everything in the NPS provided rocket boxes.  The packs were hung on the steel pack rack, and after my long hike, I crashed.  Tomorrow, I would relax, do laundry, lounge and my wife would drop in for lunch (day hiking from the rim).

Reward

Exploring Archaeological Sites in the Desert Southwest

Who Passed This Way?  Any archaeological site needs to be treated with care. They are fragile and irreplaceable. They represent our nation’s past, our heritage. And, for many, are the main reason to travel to the Four Corners region. Many of the sites in the southwest are maintained by the National Park Service (NPS). Others are managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) or US Forest Service. The rules for visiting archaeological sites located on public lands are the same: take as many pictures as you want; do not take any artifacts or relics from public land; do not make rubbings of rock art or make any marks of any kind on a rock art panel; if a site is barricaded, view it from outside the barricade; if there are signs asking you to Keep Out, respect the sign; when visiting habitation sites, do not walk on the midden.

Common sense also goes a long way when visiting an archaeological site. If the ledge holding that granary looks like it could come down at any second, it probably will – just stay on the ground and enjoy the view from there. You don’t have to climb/jump down into the kiva to get a feel for it’s history. Do not make little “Museum Rocks” at a site. Piling up the pottery, flakes, corn cobs, etc. doesn’t help anybody. By collecting and piling artifacts, you take materials out of their context, expose them to the elements more than they would be if left where they are and, very likely, you had to trample across the midden to get them in the first place. As you explore a site, the sense of discovery and exploration is going to be much better if you can find the artifacts hidden about on your own, not bunched together on a slab, where they wouldn’t normally be. And, yes, it will matter if you take just one potsherd. If every visitor to a site takes just one potsherd or flake or corn cob, there will be none of those materials left for others to see, or for archaeologists to use in interpreting the site. Besides, taking artifacts from public lands – even that “arrowhead” you found on a hike – is violation of Federal Law (Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979).

Domestic dogs and archaeological sites generally don’t mix. In the heat of the summer, and often just because they can’t help it, dogs will dig down into the soil to make a nice, cool spot to lay down. This can be disastrous inside an alcove or rock shelter site, not to mention the impact Fido has when he lifts his leg on a granary wall or room-block corner.  I have witnessed both. If you bring your dog, secure him to a tree or rock in a nice shady spot, with a bowl of water, outside of the archaeological site.

Any water-source you encounter in the desert is a matter of life or death to the birds and animals living within miles of it. Whether it’s a spring, pothole full of water or running stream, please treat it with care. Don’t bathe in it, wash dishes in it, answer the call of nature, cook or camp within 200 feet of it. And, please, under no circumstances allow your pets or stock animals to walk/play in it. Secure your llama, horse or dog, away from the pool or spring, and bring them a bowl of water. Human and domestic animal waste will ward off wildlife from, what may possibly be, the only water source within miles, as will sun-block, bug repellent, soap or other detergents – even the “bio-degradable” ones.

One last note: if you plan to explore archaeological sites in the Four Corners area, observe where you put your feet. Stay on slick rock or established trails. The crusty, black soil you will see there is alive. Composed of living organisms, “cryptobiotic soil” is the thing that keeps this region from blowing/eroding away. It fixes atmospheric nitrogen, helps retain moisture for the plants around it and stabilizes the soil/sand. One crushing boot print or tire track will take years to re-establish.

Why so much information regarding what you should not do? Simply put, the desert, and all that live in it, is incredibly fragile. The rules are there to protect it. If a few careless visitors violate the rules, or cause unnecessary damage, stricter guidelines will be made and enforced or, even worse, areas will be closed to access entirely. Take the approach that you are a guest in someone else’s house. You wouldn’t steal, leave a mess or be disrespectful. Look at all that you get to see and do during your visit.

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